Attn: Mom And Dad, How Savvy Are You On Teen Dating Violence?

If you are the parents of teenagers or know parents of teenagers, then this article that we wrote in April of 2015 is a must read. It is about The Teen Dating Violence Epidemic here in the U.S.

In a study the CDC did on teen dating violence they found the following shocking facts. Many teens believe that:

  1. “Dating violence is acceptable;
  2. One in 10 high school students has been purposely hit, slapped or hurt by a boyfriend or girlfriend;
  3. Young girls and women between the ages of 16 and 24 experience the highest rate of intimate partner violence-almost triple the national average;
  4. 72% of eighth and ninth graders are ‘dating’;
  5. Only one-third of teens who are involved in a violent relationship ever told anyone about it;
  6. 81% of parents believe teen dating violence is not an issue.”

In another study done by an organization called Teen Line On Line sponsored in part by Cedars-Sinai hospital, it was discovered that “One out of three high school students have been or will be involved in an abusive relationship. 68% of young women raped knew their rapist either as a boyfriend, friend or acquaintance.”

In light of those statistics, they recommend that the first thing you do is leave the relationship. They say on average a young woman will leave her abusive partner seven times before leaving for good. Once she has left they say it’s best to stay occupied and surrounded by people you can trust. If you feel comfortable to tell your parents what’s going on and they may be able to help more than you think. Find positive ways to spend your time and take advantage of the resources in your area. Whatever you do, do not go back to your abusive relationship. Everyone is entitled to feel safe and loved; you don’t deserve to be afraid.

In this article by the Union-Recorder in Milledgeville, GA the Mayor of that city notes that teen dating violence is on the rise in his city. The Mayor makes the point that when these teenagers were children many of them watched their parents endure domestic violence and now continue in that same vicious cycle.

From the military newsletter issued out of Joint Base San Antonio (JBSA), the authors are preaching using their skills and habits that lead to healthier relationships. February was Teen Dating Violence Prevention and Awareness Month. As part of that recognition, the Randolph Mental Health Clinic in February is helping teenagers and young adults recognize what healthy boundaries and relationships are like.

It has been my view, shared by many others, that teenagers just don’t even know what comprises a healthy relationship. Consequently, many of them feel an abusive relationship is normal, especially when placed in the context of what they see with domestic violence in their own family.

Teen dating violence is just a younger version of domestic violence where we recommend that women have a plan to escape the dangers associated with their relationships. We also recommend that these young women learn how to use and carry a self-defense Keychain Pepper Spray because it is much more likely to be with you when you need it.

Don’t be bashful-share your thoughts with us. We want to hear from you! Have you or your daughter been in a dating violence situation?