New Law In Works For College Sexual Assault

We have been writing about sexual assaults on college campuses for close to a decade now and are intimately familiar with the statistics that consistently show that one in four college age women will get sexually assaulted during her four years at a University. We also are aware that close to 90% of all sexual assaults on college campuses never get reported and that the perpetrator is known to the victim in 90% of the cases. Those statistics have been around for a while and have not changed that we know of in the last 10 years.

Despite this high level of criminal activity on college campuses, administrators have done their best to soft sell these statistics by not reporting them as required by law or not reporting them properly. For example, a felony sexual assault has been known to simply be a ‘violation of the code of conduct’ for the University. Instead of jail time for a conviction, the assailant might get a suspension or in one case a book report. In many cases the perpetrator goes free because there is no investigation.

The reasons for this obfuscation are clear. A campus with a history of sexual assaults, which, by the way, is a felony, is a PR nightmare which will detract from future enrollment and fundraising efforts so necessary for the existence of the institution.

That action, or better, that lack of action has led to lawsuits by student groups across the country demanding change. Lawmakers have made feeble attempts in the past to make laws that would address the issue.

Historically part of the problem is that administrators insist on keeping these crimes “in house” and not reporting them to local police departments for investigation. In our opinion this leads to all kinds of abuses of victims.

Several years ago we suggested that a way to clean up this mess would be to keep the University out of the investigative process and have local law enforcement investigate these crimes. Of course that idea didn’t get very far-until now!

California assembly member Mike Gatto (D-Los Angeles) has just introduced a bill which would amend the state education code to require that colleges report sexual assaults on or near campus to local law enforcement agencies.

Until that law passes and even after it passes, coeds on campus should be prepared at all times to defend themselves against sexual assaults. One of the best ways to do that is with a self-defense product such as a pepper spray or stun gun.

We have over 100 Keychain Pepper Sprays to choose from.

Any one of them is an effective defense against assaults, but this Streetwise Pepper Spray on a keychain is our biggest seller perhaps because of the selling price of $4.95 or perhaps because it is 46% hotter than competing brands.