College Sexual Assaults-Unrecognized Danger

When high school seniors and their parents start thinking about college the last thing they consider is an unrecognized danger in the number of sexual assaults on campus. Legislation like Title IX and the Clery Act have made attempts to shed light on the issue. They require Colleges and Universities to report these campus crimes annually.

One of the problems is that sexual assault on a college campus is vastly underreported. So the crime statistics in these reports are misleading at best. Many assault victims suffer in silence. In a sense then, the victims of the crime are partially at fault, at least for not reporting the crimes to authorities.

“The Department of Justice estimates that one in four college women will be the victims of rape or attempted rape sometime during her four years of College and that women in that age bracket of 16 to 24 experience rape at a rate that is four times higher than the assault rate of all women.”

So-called “victim blaming language, lack of support and the re-victimization of survivors” causes an apparent injustice.

It has been estimated that as many as 60% of all of these assaults on college campuses are alcohol facilitated.

When these young victims talk about their trauma with friends they are often met with language that blames them for what happened-or survivors blame themselves and don’t realize that what happened to them was a serious felony.

It has also been estimated that as high as 90% of all assailants were known by the victim. When the victim is forced to see her assailant on campus, in a classroom or possibly in her own dorm she suffers all over again.
For many reasons perpetrators go unpunished and victims run into unwarranted scrutiny and criticism. Word of these conditions spreads throughout the college community and further exacerbates the problem of unreported sexual assaults.

We have always suggested that women on a college campus learn how to defend themselves with a self-defense product such as a pepper spray or a stun gun. We recommend Keychain Pepper Sprays because they are more likely to be with you all the time.

Just make sure that they are legal in your area. Either one of these self-defense products can provide adequate protection in the face of sexual assault by disabling the assailant from 10 to as much as 45 minutes.
The other thing that we suggest is that college women who are victims of sexual assault report it to local police authorities rather than campus police. They are much more likely to get a more professional investigation that way.

The iStun Phone Stun Gun looks like a modern smart phone but is a powerful 3.8 million volt stun device.

We have 180 different models of Pepper Sprays to choose from. One of them will be just what you are looking for.